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IT'S OVER JEW ₪ THE LIES ARE UNDONE [WE TOLD YOU NOT TO BE STUPID, YOU MORONS!]

5 Views· 05/06/24
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⁣simon krimms - IT'S OVER JEWS. THE LIES ARE UNDONE

During WHITE BOY SUMMER 2023, VfB mentioned that he had just concluded his 24 year plan to destroy the works of the (((homosexual banking mafia)))...but imagine that this was the only plan running

Lots of us have gotten off of the couch and are OCCUPYING as we speak

Coach Dave had Tom Condit on the show today - there are people in place that can and are doing what needs to be done...but understand that our institutions were infiltrated by reckless and unholy creatures with no regard whatsoever for our well-being

They have poisoned the AIR

They have poisoned the WATER

They have poisoned the FOOD

Their very touch poisons everything in which they make contact

It's time for a BUG BOMB 💣

At the same time, shine a light about you 🌞 it's clean-up time

Part of the clean-up is waking those asleep to the facts of WW2

THERE WERE LESS THAN ZERO HOMICIDAL GAS CHAMBERS IN GERMANY🚪

Source: https://twitter.com/simkrimms/....status/1787355699271

Thumbnail: https://www.theatlantic.com/ne....wsletters/archive/20

Excerpt:

“Nearly two-thirds of US young adults unaware 6m Jews killed in the Holocaust,” The Guardian reported in 2020. “According to survey of adults 18-39, 23% said they believed the Holocaust was a myth, had been exaggerated or they weren’t sure.”

“Survey finds ‘shocking’ lack of Holocaust knowledge among millennials and Gen Z,” NBC wrote of the same study. “Over half of those thought the toll was under 2 million.”

“What do Americans know about the Holocaust? Some, not much,” said the Religion News Service of a different survey that same year. “A new Pew Research Center poll shows Americans generally know what the Holocaust was, but fewer than half can correctly cite the number of Jews killed in the Holocaust—6 million.”

“Asked to identify what Auschwitz is,” The Washington Post reported in 2018, “41 percent … could not come up with a correct response identifying it as a concentration camp or extermination camp.”

This sounds awful—until you discover what Americans know, or rather don’t know, about other things. According to a 2016 survey reported on by Voice of America, “Roughly 60 percent of college graduates couldn’t correctly name a requirement for the ratification of a constitutional amendment, and 40 percent didn’t know Congress has the constitutional authority to declare war. Not even half know that the Senate oversees presidential impeachments.” (Presumably, they’ve figured that one out since.)

When we move from college grads to all American adults, the results get even worse. 37 percent don’t know when Election Day occurs every four years.

Over half don’t know that Franklin D. Roosevelt spearheaded the New Deal. (This is setting aside the 18 percent in another survey who think it was composed by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.) Over 60 percent of respondents do not know the term lengths for senators and members of the House of Representatives. In 2021, the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania found that nearly half of American adults could not name all three branches of government. The list goes on: Half of Americans don’t know that the Supreme Court can overrule the president on constitutional questions. 64 percent don’t know that the Thirteenth Amendment ended slavery.

Put in this context, what Americans know about the Holocaust is actually quite impressive. According to Pew’s 2020 study:
When asked to describe in their own words what the Holocaust was, more than eight-in-ten Americans mention the attempted annihilation of the Jewish people or other related topics, such as concentration or death camps, Hitler, or the Nazis. Seven-in-ten know that the Holocaust happened between 1930 and 1950. And close to two-thirds know that Nazi-created ghettos were parts of a city or town where Jews were forced to live.

In other words, Americans demonstrate greater literacy about the Holocaust—an event that happened to a tiny fraction of the world’s population on a completely different continent—than they do about their own country’s institutions and history. More Americans can identify Auschwitz than their own branches of government. Tellingly, Americans across the ideological spectrum regularly make and debate Holocaust analogies, because its story is one of the few touchstones they all share. Far from a failure, Holocaust education in America has been a triumph, piercing the veil of civic ignorance that obscures so many other subjects in the popular consciousness.

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